Korean TV show uses virtual reality to ‘reunite’ sorrow stricken mother with her seven-year-old daughter who died in 2016

  • Korean TV show recounted a story of a family who lost their daughter in 2016
  • The mother put on a VR headset and was transported to a garden
  • She was met there by her dead daughter who she could touch and talk to 

Virtually reality is resurrecting the dead to help the living cope with their grief.

A Korean television show used the technology to reunite a mother with her deceased seven-year-old daughter, complete with touch-sensitive gloves and audio.

The show, called ‘Meeting You,’ recounted the story of a family’s loss their seven-year-old daughter Nayeon, who passed away from an unnamed disease in 2016.

The two were able to touch, play and hold conversations, and the little girl even reassured her mother that she was no longer in pain.

Scroll down for video 

The show, called 'Meeting You,' recounted the story of a family's loss their seven-year-old daughter Nayeon, who passed away from an unnamed disease in 2016

The show, called ‘Meeting You,’ recounted the story of a family’s loss their seven-year-old daughter Nayeon, who passed away from an unnamed disease in 2016

Jang Ji-sung, Nayeon’s mother, put on the Vive virtual reality (VR) headgear and was transported into a garden where her daughter stood there smiling in a bright purple dress. 

‘Oh my pretty, I have missed you,’ the mother can be heard saying as she strokes the digital replica of her daughter.

The Korean company Munhwa Broadcasting Corporation, or MBC, worked on designing Nayeon’s face, body and voice to be as accurate as possible, Aju Business Daily reported.

READ  Williston, Tioga receive airport awards | News, Sports, Jobs - Minot Daily News

The little girl with bright eyes and jet black hair asked her mother where she has been and if she thinks about here, Jang then responded, ‘I do all the time.’

A Korean television show used the technology to reunite a mother with her deceased seven-year-old daughter, complete with touch-sensitive gloves and audio

A Korean television show used the technology to reunite a mother with her deceased seven-year-old daughter, complete with touch-sensitive gloves and audio

Jang (pictured), who wears a necklace with Nayeon's ashes in the charm, said she did the documentary to help other people who have lost a brother, parent, or child as she had

Jang (pictured), who wears a necklace with Nayeon’s ashes in the charm, said she did the documentary to help other people who have lost a brother, parent, or child as she had

Nayeon (pictured) passed away in 2016 from an unnamed disease

Nayeon (pictured) passed away in 2016 from an unnamed disease 

As her daughter said, ‘I missed mom a lot,’ Jang replied, ‘I missed you, too.’

Jang was hesitant at first to touch the digital child until Nayeon insisted she hold her hand.

Jang held her daughter’s hand with tears streaming down her face. 

Nayeon’s father, brother and sister, who were all watching the event from the audience were also crying.

At one time, the little girl runs up to her mother and hands her a flower saying: ‘Mommy, you can see that I’m not hurting anymore, right?’

Jang Ji-sung, Nayeon's mother, put on the Vive virtual reality (VR) headgear and was transported into a garden where her daughter stood there smiling in a bright purple dress

Jang Ji-sung, Nayeon’s mother, put on the Vive virtual reality (VR) headgear and was transported into a garden where her daughter stood there smiling in a bright purple dress

The little girl with bright eyes and jet black hair asked her mother where she has been and if she thinks about here, Jang then responded, 'I do all the time'

The little girl with bright eyes and jet black hair asked her mother where she has been and if she thinks about here, Jang then responded, ‘I do all the time’

At the end of this magical journey, Nayeon lays down to sleep, saying that she was tired and her mother said goodbye.

READ  The Gene Gap: what makes us human? - Science Weekly podcast

Jang, who wears a necklace with Nayeon’s ashes in the charm, said she did the documentary to help other people who have lost a brother, parent, or child as she had.

‘Three years later, I now think I should love her more than miss her and feel sick so that I can be confident when I meet her later. I hope many people will remember Nayeon after watching the show,’ Jang wrote on her blog.

 



READ SOURCE

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here