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How can I prove the RAT is mine?

A fair few of you have been in touch about the new rules for international arrivals which mean a negative rapid antigen test within 24 hours of departure is valid, when previously only a PCR test was suitable.

How do you prove the RAT is yours if you don’t do it in front of check in staff at the airport? It’s so great, as I’m heading overseas soon to see family but I’m confused about logistics…. Do you take a photo? Upload the result?
Thanks!

-Steph in Melbourne

Good morning! So excited about the travel changes (haven’t gone anywhere in 3 years!). Silly question though, with the RAT test 24 hours prior to departure, how would they know the result? Do I just take a photo of my kit? or is it more like a statutory declaration that it’s negative? Thanks for your help!

-Excited

Good morning to all blog crew and readers. I have been following from the start. Great job! I am currently overseas visiting family. I am wondering about the new testing requirement for overseas arrivals. How to I prove that I was the one who took the RAT and that it was within 24h? Do I need to get the test done through a lab, do I need some sort of certificate in English? Any info or links will be much appreciated. Thanks heaps

-Eager to know more

Fortunately, the information is available on the health.gov website, which I have summarised here, with the information relating to RATs highlighted in bold:

Your COVID-19 test result can be paper-based or electronic.

Your results must refer to mandatory requirements: 

  • traveller name and date of birth (age at time of test or passport number accepted, if date of birth not listed)
  • the test result (such as ‘negative’ or ‘not detected’)
  • the method of test conducted e.g., NAA test or RAT
  • the date of specimen collection for the accepted COVID-19 test
  • signed by an authorised person (see below)

If this information is not provided, you will not be able to check in and board the aircraft.

For a NAA test, the laboratory will provide you with your result.

For a RAT, the test must be undertaken by or under the supervision of a medical practitioner (e.g., pharmacist, general practitioner, nurse, pathologist, pathology collector or trained personnel at airport-based testing stations).

You should provide your accepted COVID-19 test results in English where possible. If you cannot, you can:

  • also provide a certified translated copy
  • contact your airline to see if they can interpret the report when you check in.



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